Joe Barton

Happy Anniversary, Joe!

One year ago today, Rep. Joe Barton (R-Texas) sat at a Congressional hearing about the Deepwater Horizon oil spill disaster and apologized to BP executives for the White House pressure on the company.

Joe "I apologize" Barton stands up for oil companies again

Talking Points Memo reports this morning on an interview Rep. Joe Barton (R-Texas) gave to ABC News on Wednesday night. In the interview, Rep. Barton--who famously apologized to BP last summer--stands behind the billions in taxpayer money oil companies after being asked if companies like Exxon-Mobile should be getting them.

Sorry, we don't accept your apology

This morning, we reported that Rep. Joe Barton (R-Texas) apologized to BP for the White House pressure being placed on them. Under pervasive public pressure from all sides of the political debate, Rep. Barton has now apologized, saying he regrets "the impact" of his statement."

 

Well you know, what Rep. Barton, we don't accept your apology:

Rep. Joe Barton's BP apology (and his campaign cash)

Just moments ago at a U.S. House Committee hearing featuring energy executives, Texas Congressman Joe Barton (R-Texas) said he was "ashamed" of the White House's pressure on the company to take specific actions in response to the Gulf oil spill disaster.

 

Drilling for Dollars

Remember our old pal Tom DeLay? Though he’s been out of Congress for quite a few months now, his influence and backroom dealings live on, according to a new report by Public Citizen released today.

 

Reading Between the Lines

It is a bit amusing to watch Congress scrambling to figure out how to deal with rising gas prices. Even President Bush is calling to get rid of $2 billion in tax breaks that Congress passed as part of the energy bill. Despite the braggadocio, however, nobody wants to go too far, reports The New York Times:

 

Like A Free Ride When You've Already Paid

Texas Joe Barton (R-TX) is down right mad at Citgo. He's mad because while oil prices are at an all time high, Citgo had the gaul to start a program that offered heating oil to the poor in the Northeast at rates up to 60% below market price. That's right, Citgo, and only Citgo, started an oil-for-the-poor program so those less fortunate than others could heat their home this winter.