PACs

News Round-up, Sunday, Part I

This is the first of a few posts with stories from yesterday's and today's papers and wires. There are a few interesting pieces that I'll separate into other posts.

The Hill: DeLay rakes in $1.5 million for ten colleagues

This is how he tries to keep them loyal.

House Majority Leader Tom DeLay (R-Texas) will receive an overwhelming outpouring of support — in cold, hard cash — from his fellow GOP lawmakers at tonight’s Retain Our Majority Program (ROMP) fundraiser.

DeLay has raked in more than $1.5 million from his fellow lawmakers and will funnel that money to the 10 most vulnerable colleagues, as identified by House leadership.

AP: New Ethics Committee chair fires lawyers who investigated DeLay

The story.

Pretty clear retribution here.

Breaking News: Indictment Dropped Against Company In Exchange For Cooperation!

The Houston Chronicle (registration required) reported that Travis County prosecutors have announced that charges against Diversified Collection Services, Inc., one of the eight companies indicted for making illegal political contributions to a PAC run by DeLay, have been dropped in exchange for their testimony against other defendants.

Quid. Pro. Quo. T-Minus 13 Days and Counting

The Daily DeLay: T-Minus 13 Days and Counting
DeLay offered quid pro quo endorsement to son of Rep. Nick Smith in exchange for Smith’s vote on Medicare.

Earlier this month, Tom DeLay was reprimanded, rebuked, admonished, etc. by the House Ethics Committee for offering a political favor to Congressman Nick Smith (R-MI) in exchange for his support for Bush's Medicare plan.

The Ethics Committee wrote:

DeLay's Money = Dirty Money

Campaign for America's Future is getting into the act. They're calling on candidates to return DeLay's political action committee contributions.

Take action here.

We have a problem, Houston: Daily DeLay T-Minus 14 days and counting

Daily DeLay T-Minus 14 Days and Counting
DeLay strong-armed PACs and special interest lobbyists

“If you want to play in our revolution, you have to live by our rules,” DeLay tells lobbyists. He has two lists of the 400 largest PACs, those who he deems friendly and those he deems unfriendly. “We’re just following the old adage of punish your enemies and reward your friends,” DeLay says.