DeLay's Media Megaphone

The AP reports that indicted former Republican Majority Leader Tom DeLay is "[s]etting aside his own aversion to the media" as he tries to defend himself in the court of public opinion, the Associated Press reports.

Since his first indictment on Sept. 28, DeLay has made more than 20 appearances on radio and television shows. Kathleen Jamieson, of the Annenberg Center at the University of Pennsylvania, says that DeLay has adopted the standard public relations strategy of defending himself and attempting to shore up his base.

It is becoming obvious from comments by many of his fellow members that his base is wavering. A problem that Jamieson says helps to explain DeLay's press strategy.

"Historically, when people on your side decide you need to go, you go," Jamieson said. "At that point, you can't argue you are innocent."

DeLay's media machine kicked into a similar gear last year after his admonishment by the House Ethics Committee, Suzanne Gamboa reports.

"DeLay, fellow Republican lawmakers and his supporters claimed victory, saying the committee exonerated him, even though the committee actually admonished DeLay and warned him in a letter to 'temper your future actions,'" she concludes.