Follow the Money, Then Get Rid of It

The Raleigh News and Observer profiles the latest report (pdf) by Democracy North Carolina on the nearly $15 million in fees paid to lobbyists in 2005 -- that's a lot of influence bought and sold at the Capitol building, and a good example of the perfectly legal but questionable activity that happens in a pay-to-play political system. Luckily Democracy North Carolina is on the case, pushing to curb the influence of money in politics by creating full public financing of campaigns.

 

The report mentioned provides a valuable service in "following the money" to know who is paying to have the ear of a legislator and ample evidence that so long as money talks on the steps of the Capitol, the people's business will not get done. North Carolina currently has the nation's first judicial full public financing program, and is working to win Clean Elections -- also called Voter-Owned Elections -- for Council of State races and, eventually, for legislative races, as this letter to the editor advises.